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Leigh Anne Liu

Associate Professor    
Education
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
M.A., Western Kentucky University
LL.B., Foreign Affairs College
Specializations
International business
Cross-cultural negotiations and conflict
Comparative organizational behavior
Biography

Leigh Anne studies the roles of culture and cognition in negotiation, conflict management, collaboration, teams, and relationships in multicultural settings. Her research has appeared in Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, and Management and Organization Review, among other outlets. She has been a visiting professor at Toulouse Business School in France, Peking University, and Nanjing University in China. She has consulted for Fortune 500 companies and the nonprofit sectors on conflict management and multicultural competency programs. Professor Liu has taught courses and workshops for undergraduate, MBA, MIB, Ph.D., and executive students on topics of international negotiation, multicultural competency, global management, and cross-cultural behavior.

Publications
  • Liu, L.A., Friedman, R.A., Barry, B., Gelfand, M.J., & Zhang, Z-X. (2012). The dynamics of consensus building in intracultural and intercultural negotiations. Administrative Science Quarterly, 57(2), 269-304.
  • Adair, W.L. & Liu, L.A. (2011). Building shared mental models in multicultural multiparty negotiations: The dynamic process. Research on Managing Groups and Teams, 14, 57-78.
  • Danis, W., Liu, L.A., & Vacek, J. (2011). Values and upward influence strategies in transition: Evidence from the Czech Republic. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 42(2), 288-306.
  • Liu, L.A., Chua, C.H., & Stahl, G. (2010). Quality of communication experience: Definition, measurement, and implications for intercultural negotiations. Journal of Applied Psychology, 95(3), 469-487.
  • Simons, T., Friedman, R.A., Liu, L.A., & McLean Parks, J. (2007). Racial differences in sensitivity to behavioral integrity: Attitudinal consequences, in-group effects, and “trickle down” among Black and Non-Black Employees. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(3), 650-665.
 
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